Category Archives: Events

Saying thanks to The Poetry Extension and other hard-working poetry purveyors

I was recently asked to offer a testimonial for an arts initiative called The Poetry Extension. I was happy to do so, as I’d very much enjoyed their first (I hope of many) productions:

Here’s what I had to say:

I’m both a poetry reader and attendee, where possible, of poetry readings. I enjoy both the word on the page and the word brought to life. I’m blessed to live in a city that has much to offer in the way of literary events most days of the week. The majority of those events happen because of hard work by organizers, performers, venues and contributors.

If you can’t get out and/or you aren’t blessed to live somewhere that has lots of live literary events, the next best thing are virtual events. What’s wonderful about virtual events – in addition to being able to enjoy them in your pyjamas – is that they can bring together artists and performers for whom it might be difficult to be together in the same city or on the same continent, much less the same venue. That’s where initiatives such as The Poetry Extension are so brilliant, and why I was so effusive about the first of their events in March, 2016:

Amazingly, this virtual event established a balance of both professionalism and intimacy that you might not think possible in a bunch of colliding video screens in different countries. All of the readings introduced unique poetry voices in a warm, friendly, accessible format. I look forward to more such productions, and hope that The Poetry Extension can get the support it needs to make more of them possible in future.

Live or virtual, not only is it wonderful to attend such events, but it’s really rather easy to say thank you for the time and effort that goes into these vibrant offerings. Even a tweet, a Facebook comment, a quick email message are all gratifying ways to let our artists, poets, writers, performers and organizers know they are appreciated, and to let others know about the eye-opening works and events that might just be a click away. (Note, for example, that the next Poetry Extension online gathering will be livestreamed on Wednesday, August 31, 2016.)

Sprinting (like a super hero!) through The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon

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Even bookish super heroes need sustenance on reading sprints …!

“One City One Book” community reading programs, where a city promotes to its citizenry the benefits of reading the same worthy book at the same time, are a comparatively recent phenomenon with an already lively and generally respected history. Usually promoted through a city’s public libraries, every year there are more and more activities associated with bringing readers together, giving them the opportunity to meet the author, discuss and explore a book’s themes and more.

What am I doing, sitting in Toronto (which has its own “one book” programs via the Toronto Public Library) … taking part in a “one book” program based in Chicago?

  • For starters, I have always wanted to read this particular book. In fact, I’m long overdue to get lost in a book of such immense charms.

  • I’ve been curious about online reading initiatives such as sprints (offered via different social media platforms, including using the #readingsprint hashtag in Twitter), to see if they do spark reading and discussion.

  • I’m interested in the activities and tools that the Chicago Public Library is providing to its participants to encourage coming to the book in various ways convenient and comfortable to a range of readers. (Thanks to Bibliocommons for access to the special e-reader provided to Chicago library patrons.)

And so far?

  • I’m falling in love with this vivid, compelling story that grabs all of the senses. It’s captivating.

  • I’ve intentionally booked specific times in my calendar to just focus on The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. I look forward to those times, make the most of the one-hour time slots and feel like they’ve helped me establish some great reading momentum.

  • The special e-reader is a fun way of enjoying the book, because it allows you to not only easily page through, highlight and bookmark as you go along, but the sharing tools also allow you to easily capture, tweet and share passages you particularly enjoyed. From sprint to sprint, I find myself changing up between the e-reader and my physical copy of the book, which I love because it’s a fine, thick paperback that somehow feels lovely and right for the rollicking subject matter.

  • ereader-tweet

  • The social media interaction via the #readingsprint hashtag has been intermittent, but is at times a nice way of connecting with other readers. (I get more responses sometimes from people curious about what I’m doing or who have already read the book and are confirming what a good choice it is.) Some of the other activities associated with the Chicago Public Library program are also featured online, the fruits of which are very interesting to see.

Will I keep at it? Yes, indeed – this has really sparked my enthusiasm. I’ll be avidly taking part in future sprints … and I’d definitely consider this approach to kickstarting my reading in future.

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